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  1. #11

    Local Seamstress - thanks!

    Appreciate the tip on local seamstress! Thanks for starting this thread, I've already printed out a couple items to research further!

    We just started carrying Darn Tough socks. I hiked in them all summer and they kept my feet breathing on hot days and warm on wet days. During a rainy hike to Lake Ethel, I unintentionally put them to an all day "wool stays warm even when wet" test. I took them off during lunch and squeezed out excess water. I am excited to wear them this winter for the first time. The company is based in Vermont and gives a lifetime guarantee for their socks.

    http://darntough.com/women/womens-hi...-extra-cushion
    Last edited by Plain Hardware; 12-07-2015 at 09:29 AM. Reason: Wanted to add more info.

  2. #12
    In the past few (sparse coverage) winters, I've been having as much fun skiing in our backyard outside of Leavenworth as I have on epic backcountry trips in the high cascades. This is because I use my Altai Skis 'Hoks' (http://altaiskis.com/) for all my adventure-skiing needs. These skis are more of a 'ski-shoe', but when you point them downhill, they still work like a ski, not like a snowshoe (a huge bonus--ahem!). They come in very short, relatively fat sizes (125 or 145 cm length), and they have an inlaid skin under the kick zone. You can climb pretty steeply with them once you figure it out. They're also best used with a tiak--one long pole used like a rudder--than with conventional poles, especially on the downhill. They are wonderful for anyone who might want to tromp around on Forest Service roads and ski-venture. They turn better than any normal backcountry ski in tight trees, they are super fun on steep open slopes, and there's no fiddling with skins. They may be an acquired taste, but they're super fun for someone who might not want or need an expensive backcountry set-up but still wants to go explore. They're relatively cheap to get into as well, and they can be set up with a traditional 3-pin binding (to be used with lightweight touring boots) or a 'universal binding' that works (in theory, I've never tried it) with your sorels or bogs. Check out the website!

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Wenatchee
    Posts
    285
    Quote Originally Posted by HanneB View Post
    In the past few (sparse coverage) winters, I've been having as much fun skiing in our backyard outside of Leavenworth as I have on epic backcountry trips in the high cascades. This is because I use my Altai Skis 'Hoks' (http://altaiskis.com/) for all my adventure-skiing needs. These skis are more of a 'ski-shoe', but when you point them downhill, they still work like a ski, not like a snowshoe (a huge bonus--ahem!). They come in very short, relatively fat sizes (125 or 145 cm length), and they have an inlaid skin under the kick zone. You can climb pretty steeply with them once you figure it out. They're also best used with a tiak--one long pole used like a rudder--than with conventional poles, especially on the downhill. They are wonderful for anyone who might want to tromp around on Forest Service roads and ski-venture. They turn better than any normal backcountry ski in tight trees, they are super fun on steep open slopes, and there's no fiddling with skins. They may be an acquired taste, but they're super fun for someone who might not want or need an expensive backcountry set-up but still wants to go explore. They're relatively cheap to get into as well, and they can be set up with a traditional 3-pin binding (to be used with lightweight touring boots) or a 'universal binding' that works (in theory, I've never tried it) with your sorels or bogs. Check out the website!
    I have a pair from when they were made by Karhu. I tried the universal binding and didn't like it. I use my old Scarpa T2's with a three pin binding which works great. I prefer regular poles. They are fun for woods romps, but didn't perform so good off windy ridge.

  4. #14
    I have some 145 Hoks and they are great fun. Mike, I spoke with Nils Larsen, he and Francois Sylvain worked for Karhu and designed the Meta and Sweeper, Nils says the Hoks are way more ski-like than the Karhu ski shoes. They are softer flexing and have more sidecut. I like them with regular poles too. On steeper terrain you have to watch your speed because of the fore aft stability and they surprise you with how well they glide. This might be where a tiak or lurk would come in handy. If I'm skiing anything much over 25 degrees, I'm reaching for my bc rig though. Very fun bushwhacking hippy pow ski.

  5. #15
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Wenatchee
    Posts
    1,122
    Hippy Pow Ski... I like that. Hanne is young to be cast under that umbrella, but she hails from the Republic/Curlew regions, an interesting milieu of ranchers and hippies. She's a generational anomaly that's gone forward to the past. Aaron, what boot-binding system do you use with your Hoks?

  6. #16
    I use pins and older T3s.

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