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  1. #1

    Flower report 2017

    I ran my dogs up Horse Lake Rd today and was surprised to find blooming yellow bells, blue bells, buttercups, salt and pepper, wild parsnips and open but still green balsamroot buds.

  2. #2
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    Thanks for getting this rolling, Aaron. A week ago I checked the plot in the wild lands next to my house where I monitor the earliest bloomers. None of the usual suspects (salt and pepper, yellowbells, bluebells, or buttercups were up yet). Some extremely small white flowers right next to the ground and with a bloom less than a quarter-inch wide were up. I don't know the name of these tiny bloomers.

    It's interesting to compare the time frames of when flowers are coming out or peaking with previous years. To find past flower reports go to the search bar in the banner and type in 'Flower Report' and you'll see the reports dating back to 2013.

    Here's the link for Flower Report - 2016
    And the link for the Flower Report - 2015

    And the link for 2015

  3. #3
    Found the first(for me) balsamroot in bloom on the south slopes of Saddlerock. A lone plant in bloom others not far behind. Quite a few "Spring Beauties" on north facing slopes and the first "prairie stars" I've seen this spring.

  4. #4
    Stunning display of prairie stars, blue bells and shooting stars on the north end of Balsamroot today. Lots of balsamroot in bloom. Also saw white and pink phlox, ballhead waterleaf and vetch? There are some lupines a few days to a week away from blooming.

  5. #5
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    The Saddle Rock area has exploded with Balsam Root over the last few days, Horse Lake and Sage Hills are looking good though the wildflowers are not as prevalent yet.

  6. #6
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    I was out of town for several weeks and when I returned (April 12) the Prairie Stars were out in thicker force than normal in the Sage Hills. At that time some balsamroots were out and the bigger bloom was coming. My impression of the flowers in the Sage is that the more 'normal' flower progression has all been compressed. The cooler spring has lots of flowers blooming together when normally the bloom might be spread out over a longer period. Not sure this true, but it has been my impression. Any others felt the same?

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by adappen View Post
    I was out of town for several weeks and when I returned (April 12) the Prairie Stars were out in thicker force than normal in the Sage Hills. At that time some balsamroots were out and the bigger bloom was coming. My impression of the flowers in the Sage is that the more 'normal' flower progression has all been compressed. The cooler spring has lots of flowers blooming together when normally the bloom might be spread out over a longer period. Not sure this true, but it has been my impression. Any others felt the same?
    Yes, I'm seeing flowers blooming together that I haven't seen before. Spring beauties with shooting stars and bluebells. Lupine is already out down low alongside prairie stars and ballhead waterleaf etc.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by AaronW View Post
    Yes, I'm seeing flowers blooming together that I haven't seen before. Spring beauties with shooting stars and bluebells. Lupine is already out down low alongside prairie stars and ballhead waterleaf etc.
    I wonder if this messes with the pollinators that might emerge to find they missed their flower?

  9. #9
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    Plants seem to emerge and bloom within a distribution curve -- there will be a few early bloomers in each specie, the main glut of plants, and then the late bloomers of that specie -- survival strategy for the vagaries of weather. Likely the same holds true for the pollinators?? Good question for that bee-guy you may know.

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